Posted 12 hours ago

ronniefieg:

Ronnie Fieg x Clarks “Kildare” limited to 500 pairs per color. Available April 26th, $160.

Posted 13 hours ago

exploratorium:

"The light show is like playing modern music on antique instruments, it mixes old and new techniques. The light appears to move to the music. You hear something and you see something, and as the listener/viewer, you make the connection between the two. The viewer does the work. It’s a kind of synesthesia."


Learn more from #TheJoshuaLightShow at tomorrow’s Behind the Screen: Deconstructing the Joshua Light Show workshop. RSVP with cinemaarts@exploratorium.edu and join us.

Photo by Gayle Laird © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Posted 13 hours ago
Posted 13 hours ago

explore-blog:

Maurice Sendak’s Chicken Soup with Rice, one of Dinah Fried’s brilliant Fictitious Dishes – meals from beloved books, which she cooks, art-directs, and photographs

Posted 13 hours ago
america-wakiewakie:


World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera
Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.
In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.
It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.
The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.
But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.
In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera

Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.

In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.

It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.

The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.

But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.

In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

Posted 14 hours ago

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

S. Ross Browne

Series: Self-Evident Truths

from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.

I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.

The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.

The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?

Posted 14 hours ago

Hilde Andra “Yin Yang”

Posted 14 hours ago
Posted 14 hours ago

2headedsnake:

Daniel Stepanek

Posted 14 hours ago

ralewis:

Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry.

On Civil Rights

“I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
"Eat in the kitchen,"
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America.” 

Posted 14 hours ago

thingsamylikes:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

Daisy tells it like it is.

Posted 14 hours ago
Posted 15 hours ago

pitchfork:

Check out our Top 25 picks for this year’s Record Store Day.

(Source: televandalist)

Posted 15 hours ago
iwdrm:

"From now on will be total organization. Every muscle must be tight."
Taxi Driver (1976)

iwdrm:

"From now on will be total organization. Every muscle must be tight."

Taxi Driver (1976)

Posted 15 hours ago

g1988:

Can it get more epic than Scott C’s contribution to our Ghostbusters show?This painting is mind-blowing.

Come see it in person, starting TOMORROW, at our NY pop-up location at 69 Leonard St. in New York City. We will have our opening reception from 7-10 PM, then be open every day through the 26th, even Easter, from 11-7 PM.

Learn as much as you can at Ghostbusters30th.com.